Al Jazari Childhood & Education...

™Al Jazari was the most outstanding mechanical engineer of his time. His full name was Badi’ al-Zaman Abu-‘l-‘Izz Ibn Isma’il Ibn al-Razzaz al-Jazari. Al-Jazari was born in Damascus at a time where his parents were long past the age of having children yet his father (a merchant), had not given up all hope of having a child even after 40 years of marriage. It is said that Al-Jazari was born after his father’s prayers for a son during the Hajj. He completed the memorization of the Quran at the age of 13 and learned the art of Qur’anic recitation at an early age. Damascus, al-Jazari founded and headed Dar al-Qur’an, a school that specialized in Qur’anic sciences. He travelled to Mecca, Medina, Cairo and Alexandria where he took knowledge from its scholars and in 774 AH, he was authorized by his teacher Ibn Kathir  to issue verdicts in Islamic law. He served as a qadi (judge) of Damascus in 793 AH and later in Shiraz where he died. He lived in Diyar-Bakir (in Turkey) during the 6th century H (late 1 He was called Al-Jazari after the place of his birth, Al-Jazira, the area lying between the Tigris and the Euphrates in Mesopotamia. Like his father before him, he served the Artuqid kings of Diyar-Bakir for several decades as a mechanical engineer. In 1206, he completed an outstanding book on engineering entitled Al-Jami’ bayn al-‘ilm wa-‘l-‘amal al-nafi’ fi sinat’at al-hiyal in Arabic. It was a compendium of theoretical and practical mechanics.2th century-early 13th century CE). Some of his devices were inspired by earlier devices, such as one of his monumental water clocks, which were based on that of a Pseudo – Archimedes. He also cites the influence of the Banu Musa brothers for his fountains, Al – Asturlabi for the design of a candle clock,...

Al Zahrawi – Writing...

During the era of the golden age, Muslim civilization invested a fame surgeon master into history, whose had significantly contributed to the medical surgery achievement. He had invented multiple methods and procedures of modern surgery, and also invented a lot of surgery tools and technology. It was no wonder that he re-known as the master or the father of modern surgery. The inventor of the modern surgeon Abu al-Qasim Al-Zahrawi was born in 936M. The west world knows him as Abulcasis. He was known as a phenomenal surgeon of the time. His works and thoughts had adopted a lot to the west medical. The noble surgeon Al Zahrawi was born in 936 A.D. in Zahra, a small city located on the outskirts of Cordoba, Muslim Spain. It was in Cordoba that he had gained his education and then gave his medical lectures, gave his public health services, and developed surgeon technology to his death. There is indeed, very little about his youth history that was revealed. In case, his hometown in Zahra had burned out over the years of war. The history of Al Zahrawi was then written up0 when Andalusia’s scientist Abu Muhammad Ibn Hazm enlisted him as one of a noble surgeon master of Spain in Al-Humaydi’s Jadhwat al Muqtabis, a book written six decades after his death. Al Zahrawi dedicated a lot of years to his life only to surgeon and medical teaching. His noble was brought to him to the royal services of kingdom in the era of Al-Hakam II Khalif of Andalus. He had not traveled a lot just like any other Muslim scholars of the time. His concern and focus dedication was on accident and war victims. Al Zahrawi’s colleagues confessed that Al Zahrawi is a genius when...

Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi (Writing)...

His name Razi in Persian means “from the city of Rey”, an ancient town called Ragha in old Persian       The most free-thinking of the major philosophers of Islam, al-Razi was born in Rey, where he was well trained in the Greek sciences. He was well versed in musical theory and performance before becoming a physician. Becoming a Physician, al-Razi  directed two major hospitals, one in Baghdad, the capital of the Islamic empire at that time, and another in his native city of Rayy in northern Iran. His writings on medicine were universally admired.  Razi wrote a pioneering book about smallpox providing clinical characterization of the diseases.”Smallpox appears when blood ‘boils’ and is infected, resulting in vapours being expelled. Thus juvenile blood (which looks like wet extracts appearing on the skin) is being transformed into richer blood, having the color of mature wine. At this stage, smallpox shows up essentially as ‘bubbles found in wine’ – (as blisters) – … this disease can also occur at other times – (meaning: not only during childhood) -. The best thing to do during this first stage is to keep away from it, otherwise this disease might turn into an epidemic.” Al-Razi said. Through translation, his medical works and ideas became known among medieval European and profoundly influenced medical education in the Latin West. Some volumes of his work Al-Mansuri, namely “On Surgery” and “A General Book on Therapy”, became part of the medical curriculum in Western universities. As a teacher of medicine, he attracted students of all backgrounds and interests and was said to be compassionate and devoted. Edward Granville Browne considers him as “probably the greatest and most original of all the physicians, and one of the most prolific as an author....

Ibn Sina’s Childhood...

Today, the only information we have about Ibn Sina’s (see: Avicenna) early childhood comes from his own autobiography, other details of his life come from his disciple Al-Juzajani. Born in 980 near Bukhara, modern day Uzbekistan, Ibn Sina’s father was a governor of the village which they lived in, and grew up witnessing numerous and frequent intellectual meetings in his father’s house.  Ibn Sina had mastered the memorization of the Quraan, the holy Islamic book, by age 10. His memory and keen attention and fueled desire to seek knowledge stunned his professors. At 14 years of age, he was so driven by the philosophy branch metaphysics that he memorized Aristotle’s Metaphysics. His hunger for knowledge compelled him to teach himself the conceptual foundations of medicine and the basics of chemistry by age 16, and began successfully treating the ill near his vicinity, with a remarkably prominent incident where he treated the King of Bukhara of an identified illness, and was honored by being granted access to the Royal Library of Samanids, where he spent years intensely researching various aspects of science. The political turbulence in The Samanid Dynasty triggered severe instability in Bukhara  At only 21 years of age, Ibn Sina was a court physician and a political administrator. His father’s death greatly affected him, for without a mentor, he spent years wandering villages, working as a professor of philosophy and scientist by day, and holding discussions for him, students, and whoever was interested in anything that encompassed philosophy or medicine. Ibn Sina insists that he was mainly self taught through the teaching of Aristotle, Plato, and such. He has published over 450 books on philosophy, the two most prominent being “The Book of Healing”, an encyclopedia that covered nearly everything on philosophy, and...

Al-Khawarizmy: Childhood and Upbringing (WRITING) May14

Al-Khawarizmy: Childhood and Upbringing (WRITING)...

Not much is known about Al-Khawarizmy’s childhood and upbringing, which is unfortunate as it may have held a key to his genius mind. Considering he lived in a time almost obsolete to us, very little is recorded of him due to irregular and incompetent means of recording and preservoing data. He was born in a Persian family in Chorasmia, in Central Western Asia (Uzbekistan today)   in 780. He was raised in the Medieval Era, The Islamic Golden Era, which is somewhat an indication to his success. His nation was successful, rising and stable, providing an environment that can and did promote intelligence and creativity. This eventually led to incredible inventions, contributions and an influence today that cannot be disregarded. His father was a man of education, he believed in its importance and power, as well as that of religion. This, he passed on to his son, which is obviously evident as this had a major effect on his life. Very little is known about his personal life. The preface of his Algebra indicates he was an Orthodox Muslim, but other sources dictate that he might have been a follower of the Zoroastrian religion in his early days. He completed Algebra along with several other books in Baghdad, which had developed into the center of scientific studies in the world perhaps, as not only did Persians like Al-Khawarizmy move there, but scientists from as far as China and India travelled to the city. He worked in The House of Wisdom, a scientific research and teaching center, established by Caliph al-Ma’mun, where he studied sciences and math. Al-Kawarizmy is referred to as “…one of the greatest minds of Islam, he influenced mathematical thought to a greater extent than any other medieval writer.” He has not only...