Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi (Writing)...

His name Razi in Persian means “from the city of Rey”, an ancient town called Ragha in old Persian       The most free-thinking of the major philosophers of Islam, al-Razi was born in Rey, where he was well trained in the Greek sciences. He was well versed in musical theory and performance before becoming a physician. Becoming a Physician, al-Razi  directed two major hospitals, one in Baghdad, the capital of the Islamic empire at that time, and another in his native city of Rayy in northern Iran. His writings on medicine were universally admired.  Razi wrote a pioneering book about smallpox providing clinical characterization of the diseases.”Smallpox appears when blood ‘boils’ and is infected, resulting in vapours being expelled. Thus juvenile blood (which looks like wet extracts appearing on the skin) is being transformed into richer blood, having the color of mature wine. At this stage, smallpox shows up essentially as ‘bubbles found in wine’ – (as blisters) – … this disease can also occur at other times – (meaning: not only during childhood) -. The best thing to do during this first stage is to keep away from it, otherwise this disease might turn into an epidemic.” Al-Razi said. Through translation, his medical works and ideas became known among medieval European and profoundly influenced medical education in the Latin West. Some volumes of his work Al-Mansuri, namely “On Surgery” and “A General Book on Therapy”, became part of the medical curriculum in Western universities. As a teacher of medicine, he attracted students of all backgrounds and interests and was said to be compassionate and devoted. Edward Granville Browne considers him as “probably the greatest and most original of all the physicians, and one of the most prolific as an author....

An Interview about Ahmad Zewail...

Pictures -Scholars’ impact on world today Apr10

Pictures -Scholars’ impact on world today...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/myhayah/sets/72157633211484155/

Ibn Sina – Videocast...

Ibn Sina – Writing...

Mohamed Sabry 10R 26/2/2013 Writing Piece – Muslim Scholars A renowned polymath, the Muslim scholar Ibn Sina offered numerous contributions to multifarious fields encompassing mathematics, philosophy, physics and astronomy amongst others. Ibn Sina was exposed to various factors throughout his childhood that tremendously facilitated his rise as an influential Muslim scholar comprised of his family, community, and individual acquaintances. Residing in the village of Qishlak Afshona (in modern day Uzbekistan) in the year 980, Ibn Sina was born to a middle class family with his mother, Setareh, initially from Bukhara whereas his father was a venerated scholar from Balkh, a foremost city in the Samanid Empire. Serving as a governor at the time, Ibn Sina’s father resolutely endorsed the prospect of education and consequently inducted his son into a school in Bukhara. Throughout his childhood, Ibn Sina conveyed tremendous intelligence, ingenuity, and uncanny memorization dexterities. At the age of fourteen, Ibn Sina successfully superseded the knowledge of his professors and mentors, obtaining knowledge in an unprecedented period of time as denoted in his autobiography. Ibn Sina’s uncanny memorization is elucidated by the manner in which he had completely memorized the Quran by the age of ten. There has been a divergence between scholars pertaining to the Islamic beliefs of Ibn Sina or his Mathhab. Scholars comprised of Dimtri Gutas and Aisha Khan have argued that Ibn Sina adopted the Sunni hanafi faith, whereas Shia scholar Nurullah Shushtari endorses his adoption of the Shia faith. Ibn Sina was introduced to Indian arithmetic by an Indian grocer and augmented his understanding of the subject through profound studying of the field. In supplementation of arithmetic and mathematics, Ibn Sina simultaneously studied Islamic Fiqh, or the theory of Islamic Law, in accordance with the teachings of the Hannfi...