Al-Razi’s Collage...

Al Zahrawi – Writing...

During the era of the golden age, Muslim civilization invested a fame surgeon master into history, whose had significantly contributed to the medical surgery achievement. He had invented multiple methods and procedures of modern surgery, and also invented a lot of surgery tools and technology. It was no wonder that he re-known as the master or the father of modern surgery. The inventor of the modern surgeon Abu al-Qasim Al-Zahrawi was born in 936M. The west world knows him as Abulcasis. He was known as a phenomenal surgeon of the time. His works and thoughts had adopted a lot to the west medical. The noble surgeon Al Zahrawi was born in 936 A.D. in Zahra, a small city located on the outskirts of Cordoba, Muslim Spain. It was in Cordoba that he had gained his education and then gave his medical lectures, gave his public health services, and developed surgeon technology to his death. There is indeed, very little about his youth history that was revealed. In case, his hometown in Zahra had burned out over the years of war. The history of Al Zahrawi was then written up0 when Andalusia’s scientist Abu Muhammad Ibn Hazm enlisted him as one of a noble surgeon master of Spain in Al-Humaydi’s Jadhwat al Muqtabis, a book written six decades after his death. Al Zahrawi dedicated a lot of years to his life only to surgeon and medical teaching. His noble was brought to him to the royal services of kingdom in the era of Al-Hakam II Khalif of Andalus. He had not traveled a lot just like any other Muslim scholars of the time. His concern and focus dedication was on accident and war victims. Al Zahrawi’s colleagues confessed that Al Zahrawi is a genius when...

Al Khawarizmy: Timeline (CARTOON)...

Al-Jazari —- Writing...

  Al-Jazari was more of a practical engineer . “More interested in the craftsmanship necessary to construct the devices than in the technology which lay behind them” and his machines were usually “assembled by trial and error rather than by theoretical calculation. Some of Al-Jazari’s devices were inspired by devices such as one of his waterclocks which was based on that of a Pseudo-Archimedes. He was also inspired by Hibat Allah ibn al-Husayn (d. 1139) for musical automata. His full name was Badi Al-Zaman Abul-Ezz Ibn Ismail Ibn Al-Razzaz Al-Jazari and he lived in Diyar-Bakir (in Turkey) during the 6th century. The book he wrote contains instructions about the construction of 50  various machines .  These include water clocks. Al-Jazari also describes methods of construction and assembly in scrupulous detail of the fifty or so machines in it to enable future craftsmen to reconstruct them. And he was successful in that, for many of his devices were constructed following his instructions. The work by al-Jazari is also unique in the way that other writers often fail to give sufficient details, because amongst others, they are not craftsmen themselves, or kept their secrets, or if they were craftsmen, they could have been illiterate .Al-jazari made elephant clocks work with water power.  Moreover, Al-Jazari also explained how to transport water without manual labour. The six main categories are: water-clocks and candle-clocks, vessels and pitchers, vessels and basins for hand washing and surgical purposes, fountains and musical machines, water-raising machines; and miscell-aneous machines. He also invented a number of machines. Al-Jazari’s machines involved a large number of techniques and mechanisms. To the development of machines, such as axles, segmental gear wheel, flume-beam swape, crank as part of machine, suction pipes, regulators and control systems, accurate calibration of...

Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi (Writing)...

His name Razi in Persian means “from the city of Rey”, an ancient town called Ragha in old Persian       The most free-thinking of the major philosophers of Islam, al-Razi was born in Rey, where he was well trained in the Greek sciences. He was well versed in musical theory and performance before becoming a physician. Becoming a Physician, al-Razi  directed two major hospitals, one in Baghdad, the capital of the Islamic empire at that time, and another in his native city of Rayy in northern Iran. His writings on medicine were universally admired.  Razi wrote a pioneering book about smallpox providing clinical characterization of the diseases.”Smallpox appears when blood ‘boils’ and is infected, resulting in vapours being expelled. Thus juvenile blood (which looks like wet extracts appearing on the skin) is being transformed into richer blood, having the color of mature wine. At this stage, smallpox shows up essentially as ‘bubbles found in wine’ – (as blisters) – … this disease can also occur at other times – (meaning: not only during childhood) -. The best thing to do during this first stage is to keep away from it, otherwise this disease might turn into an epidemic.” Al-Razi said. Through translation, his medical works and ideas became known among medieval European and profoundly influenced medical education in the Latin West. Some volumes of his work Al-Mansuri, namely “On Surgery” and “A General Book on Therapy”, became part of the medical curriculum in Western universities. As a teacher of medicine, he attracted students of all backgrounds and interests and was said to be compassionate and devoted. Edward Granville Browne considers him as “probably the greatest and most original of all the physicians, and one of the most prolific as an author....